You do not need to file before launching a test the waters campaign. *However*, there’s this (from CrowdCheck): “Once a company has relied on the testing the waters provision under Rule 255 without having filed anything with the SEC or state regulators, it may only rely on Tier 2 of the new Regulation A+ rules.”

Note: (our experience, and not to be confused with legal advice) Attorney’s tend to recommend you DON’T do a tier 1 Reg A campaign due to the costs of several intrastate filings.

First and foremost: a business plan. It doesn’t need to be completely finalized. We can “punch” it up for you, but you need to be the one to guide it. We don’t build business plans from scratch, nor can we mend a broken one, or finalize an incomplete one.

It truly depends on the raise amount, your industry, your target investor, and the forecasted amount of the average investment. If you’re looking to target retail investors, for example, you will need to take a broad approach and engage in more communication during the campaign. Equity campaigns that target accredited investors, or institutional dollars, are much narrower and scope, with a very targeted pitch.

You hire an experienced team with a diverse set of skills to provide a plan of attack, guidance, project management, help in navigating crowdfunding regulations, introductions to our vetted network of experts, access to proprietary tools and templates, pre-built campaign assets, access to vendor and investor databases, and a group of people who want you to succeed just as much as you do.

No. Our team talks to potential crowdfunders on an almost daily basis, so requiring an NDA for an opening conversation would be a pretty high price for us. Just like you, we’re working on our best ideas. If you have one that’s really that good, your biggest danger is in receiving a resume—from us.

We’re a fee-based service, which may also necessitate taking additional management fees for managing your digital spend (if you hire us to do that for you).

Legally, we are prohibited from taking any compensation that’s tied to the success of a raise. Commissions are not an option for payment.

It’s not an uncommon question, but we do not.

We have taken on clients that have failed. There’s a saying, “Good, fast, cheap.” Here’s one life truth we know well: you get two, but rarely do you get all three. Crowdfunding is not immune to this phenomenon.

Here’s why we think so: on the job, in business school, and in life, we’ve been trained to keep our eyes on this prize: Return On Investment. This is why a lot of the work we do for our clients—and it takes hundreds of steps to get a campaign off the ground—will be useful long after your campaign ends. Sometimes, the assets we provide will continue to be applicable for years.

Our clients are really, really good at what they do. But that doesn’t always apply to marketing and strategy, and that’s where we come in. We help our clients perfect their pitch, solidify their target audience, create customized design and style guides, and a strong messaging hierarchy (the foundation for any and all marketing copy and content). If you look at the services we provide with that lens, you’ll realize that if you haven’t done that critical marketing work yet, it will need to be done at some point anyway.

Here’s another insight we can offer up, because we’ve seen this over and over again—doing it right the first time means your investment pays for itself many times over.

As long as you don’t endorse the content (like, share, link to, etc.) this is not a problem. You are only responsible for communications that you create. Be sure to be clear when asking people to post not to change any copy that you have supplied them. Again, if everything that is being shared is compliant there is no need to worry.

Regular business advertising is still allowed. To be safe don’t mention any financial or product performance information, but ads stating the purpose of your product, company, or general solicitation of customers are ok. In addition do not link these ads to your raise. You can however, link these to a landing page where there is an option to go to the raise, but make sure there are no terms of your deal on that page.

Quotes from influencers are fine as long as they are not endorsing YOUR RAISE. They can endorse your company, product, or staff, but again, be careful to stay away from statements of future growth.

This is fine. You can use the same platform to send a Tombstone and Non Terms advertisement or communication as long as they are not the same communication. For example; you can post a tombstone ad or post on Facebook followed by a non-terms advertisement or post.

In non-terms based communication these are fine. Do not include these metrics in any way when mentioning terms of your deal. Also, do not include any information about past raise performance.

Be careful in this space. Current regulations do not allow you to “condition the market” or “test the waters.” This can make it difficult to gauge the interest in your raise, but typical business advertising can take place. A good rule of thumb to avoid breaking compliance is to not include any financial information in your advertisements before your campaign goes live.

In tombstone communications be careful not to use any language that implies growth. Also do not use language that describes how your product works or the overall addressable market for the product. Customer endorsements are also not allowed in tombstone advertisements. No term communications cannot mention any terms. Saything things like “be an owner” can be seen as a term since ownership and equity are often seen as the same thing.

No. You can, for example say; “Company X has an equity crowdfunding campaign on SuperPortal

The term in this example is Equity. Terms can also include price/share, minimum and maximum investments, total amount to be raised, and closing date of the raise.

There are two types of communications you can make in regards to your offering; Tombstone and No Terms communications. Tombstone communications mention the terms of your raise and must link directly to your site where all of the terms for your deal are available. No terms communications are just what they sound like and are much more flexible than tombstone communications. This type of communication cannot mention or allude to any terms of your deal.

  • Not Planning.
  • Not thinking through the offering terms and their long-term implications.

Yes, but only US companies can do Title III crowdfunding. You need to be incorporated in the U.S..

Kendrick Nguyen Hi Joe – on the low end, it would be at least $6K. The more mature company is, the more accounting and legal work the campaign would require, and the cost can easily run higher than $12K.

You CAN energize your base YOU CAN launch without publicity to your target audience. (Georgia)

Harold – yes you could. The important thing is to be realistic about the amount of debt the company can support and to honestly disclose the amount of debt the company currently has and will have post raise.

Most are SAFEs, and preferred stock. Oh and there is a platform called NextSeed that does solely notes.

As to deal structure, there are no requirements on the type of security that is being offered That means you can offer common or preferred stock, notes, convertible notes, SAFEs or rev shares.Most are SAFEs, and preferred stock. Oh and there is a platform called NextSeed that does solely notes.

After the forms have been filed and responses have been received from the SEC and the comment period is complete and final docs are filed.

  • Lawyer
  • Platform
  • Accountant
  • Transaction Engine (Often provided by Platform
  • Internal Client Team
  • Marketing Group
  • Fund Manager
  • Transfer Agent
  • EDGAR Filer

Some offerings might also need a:

  • Distribution Network
  • Clearing Broker
  • Escrow Agent

Under Reg A+, companies can raise a maximum of $50M annually from all age 18 and over accredited and non-accredited investors. The investment limits are per deal, not an annual aggregate. Investors can sell their shares at any point after the offering has closed, although there may be a limited or no trading market which will impact your ability to sell shares. Only invest an amount that you can afford to risk or lose and will not impact your lifestyle.

Strategic Planning

  1. Persona Exercise
  2. Content Review
  3. KW analysis
    1. Interview: Client Dashboard/Cluster Review
  4. Content prioritization
  5. Content / Marketing Mix
    1. Budget, allocated pieces

Campaign Creation and Rollout

  1. Interview / Ask Client about cluster / keyword dynamics (Writer > Editor)
    1. any notes specific cases,  your POV, etc.
  2. Research (Writer)
  3. Pitch concepts (Writer > Editor)
  4. Draft Article (Writer)
  5. Apply Gabi Filter (Editor)
  6. Apply Design / photos (Design)
  7. Client Review (Editor  > Client)
  8. Social posts / supporting assets / Campaign /  PPC (Writer / CTC)
  9. Client Revision 1 (Editor / Writer)
  10. Post / Publish (CTC)
    1. Submissions

Yes. Thats enough for an efficient read on Adwords + social for the first 90 days, and we’ll make efforts to stretch it to more, if possible. We can revisit that, however, based on your data and trending ROI.

You’re right to focus on the cost per acquired, but don’t get misled comparing yourself to number from an outside source even within your competitive set. That metric includes sales, customer service, UX, and a host of other variables. The measure of success will be the improvement of your own performance versus comparing to another business. The only benchmark that matters is your own.

Here’s how we would approach it:

At 30 days, our priority would be to establish a baseline process that ensures we have the resources we need, that we understand the goals we need to meet, and that we are generating data that isn’t overlooking any channels or insights that defines the path forward. In that first month, our metrics would be the following:

  • Current cost of “inaction” (as our number to beat) = acquisition costs * growth
  • Lifetime marketing value p/investor = allocated marketing spend * average # of invested deals * average revenue p/deal
  • Baseline ad experiments for channels that don’t yet have existing marketing
  • Our target = The difference in the above to optimize conversions and stimulate growth

At 60 days, we predict traffic will be up, but the conversion rate may go down as we refine incoming traffic sources. In the long term even really low cost per clicks can be too costly to be effective due to low conversion rates. We’ll start refinement efforts and make decisions on where to focus on sources to drive down cost trends, and how much room we think there is to optimize.

At 90+ days, we’ll be seeing more traffic AND lower costs per lead. Inbound & SEO will begin adding efficiencies in organic traffic, social will start trending up, and the elevated search rankings will start to drive cost per clicks down (this is better measured at 6 months). We will review progress and the output of optimizations from the previous month, discuss the game plan for the next layer of low hanging fruit, and initiate new, refined campaigns based on both.

Here’s why we think so: on the job, in business school, and in life, we’ve been trained to keep our eyes on this prize: Return On Investment. This is why a lot of the work we do for our clients—and it takes hundreds of steps to get a campaign off the ground—will be useful long after your campaign ends. Sometimes, the assets we provide will continue to be applicable for years.

Our clients are really, really good at what they do. But that doesn’t always apply to marketing and strategy, and that’s where we come in. We help our clients perfect their pitch, solidify their target audience, create customized design and style guides, and a strong messaging hierarchy (the foundation for any and all marketing copy and content). If you look at the services we provide with that lens, you’ll realize that if you haven’t done that marketing work yet, it will need to be done at some point anyway.

Here’s what we firmly believe to be true because we’ve seen this over and over again: doing it right the first time means your investment pays for itself many times over.

Yep. We have taken on clients that have failed. There are many ways to predict a campaigns success, and unfortunately sometimes those assets don’t come to fruition. If we spot these weaknesses we’ll notify you, but note there’s a saying, “Good, fast, cheap.” Here’s one life truth we know well: you get two, but rarely do you get all three. Crowdfunding is not immune to this phenomenon.

Usually no, because it can shift an undue amount of risk onto our team we’ll consider all questions if there are some really unique reasons, but much of our work and related expenses will be prior to the raise and we’ll need capital to set them in motion.

You hire an experienced team with a diverse set of skills to provide a plan of attack, navigate crowdfunding regulations, introductions to our vetted network of experts, access to proprietary tools and templates, pre-built campaign assets, access to vendor and investor databases, and digital marketing services like SEO, web design, PPC, campaign creation and conversion optimization. Most of all, we’re a group of people who want you to succeed just as much as you do

Truly, it depends on the raise amount, industry, the target investor, and the forecasted amount of the average investment. If you’re looking to target retail investors, for example, you will need to take a broad approach and engage in more communication during the campaign. Equity campaigns targeting accredited investors, or institutional dollars, are much narrower and scope, with a very targeted pitch.

First and foremost: a little time, and a business plan. When we have more time, so It doesn’t need to be completely finalized and we can critique weaknesses and “punch” it up for you, but you will need to have a team member that guides it. Building your strategy from scratch would be costly.

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